It’s in the Details…

January 18, 2018

Have you ever caught yourself working on a project that felt so tedious you wonder if it’s worth continuing? Almost as if the work and time invested just doesn’t seem worth the end result? I feel this way when I mop my floors. Is it even worth cleaning them? Because in three days, my dogs will have tracked in enough mud, I’ll have to start the task over again. It seems like hours of work down the drain without anyone to appreciate it. But the truth is all work, even the small stuff, is important.

People are not always going to notice your hard work on a project, but they most certainly will recognize when you are slacking. One small mistake can jeopardize how your business is perceived. In an article from Bizjournals.com, “Customer service starts with attention to details,” it discusses “moments of truth.” These moments can make or break opportunities for your business. Waiting too long to answer a phone, failing to offer water during meetings, or simply misspelling a name can impact how your company is viewed. For me personally, I am sensitive about my name. It’s Michelle, with two ‘L’s. I can’t count the number of times someone has assumed my name has only one ‘L’ and doesn’t ask me to confirm it. Immediately, I’ve made my first perception about their company.

Details, no matter how minute, are vital to the work place both inside and out. It’s just as important to focus on details that affect your team as well. When collaborating on a project, your team member probably won’t notice your extra 30 minutes spellchecking throughout the group proposal. However, they’re likely to lose confidence if they realize you don’t know the difference between “effect” and “affect.” Inattention to detail will look careless; which in turn, adds concern about the quality of final product.

In the office, it’s not just your work that requires details, it’s how you treat your colleagues. Knowing that Jack likes exactly two Stevia packets in his latte, while Jill prefers dark roast black coffee, will make them feel appreciated and cared for. This type of attention to detail helps boost morale and productivity in the office. Not to mention you’re doing something nice for someone else … go you!

So, I will continue to mop my floors, because I never know when my mom is going to visit. And you can get back to that tedious project you’re working on and know that it is important. Because, if you fail to pay attention to those details, you could lose business or make someone feel undervalued, and we simply can’t have that.

About the Author 

+Michelle Genova is a consultant at Morrison & Company, providing business valuations, business planning (including budgeting, cash flow forecasting, and strategic planning), feasibility studies, recruitment, interim executive CFO services, competitive grant writing and special projects that don't fit into any conventional category. You can contact Michelle directly at mgenova@morrisonco.net or via telephone at 530-893-4764 ext. 209.

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